2019 ANNUAL WATER QUALITY REPORT​​ 
FOR THE VILLAGE OF HAMEL

This report is designed to inform you about the quality of water we delivered to you over the past year. Copies will be available at the Hamel Village Hall,​​ 111 S.​​ Old U.S. Rt. 66, Hamel, IL. If you wish to have a copy mailed to you or if you have any questions about this report, please contact the water supply operator, Don Grimm (618) 633-2484, or attend our regularly scheduled meetings, 7:00 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at the Village Hall,​​ 111 S. Old U.S. Rt. 66, Hamel, IL.

Hamel purchases water from Bond/Madison Water Company who in turn is supplied by the Illinois American Water Company. This water is piped from the Granite City and East St. Louis Water Treatment Plant which receives water from the Mississippi Rivers. A source water assessment for the Granite City and East St. Louis systems have been completed by the Illinois EPA. If you would like a summary of the information contained in this report, contact Rachel Bretz, Illinois American Water Quality Supervisor at (618) 465-6736 ext. 4. IEPA considers all surface water sources of community water supply to be susceptible to potential pollution problems, hence, the reason for mandatory treatment for all surface water supplies in Illinois. Mandatory treatment includes coagulation, sedimentation, filtration, and disinfection.

SOURCE WATER INFORMATION

Source Water NameType of Water  Report Status

CC 02-METER STAUNTON RD.FF-IL1195280 TP02  SW   ___________  NE IL 140 AND STAUNTON RD METER

CC 03-MASTER METER  ​​​​  FF IL0050020 TP01  SW   ___________

The Granite City distribution system also has an interconnection with the East St. Louis distribution system. Water is routinely supplied to the Granite​​ City​​ 
system through that connection. To view a summary version of the completed Source Water Assessments you may access the IEPA website at​​ http://www.epa.state.il.us/cgi-bin/wp/swap-fact-sheets.pl.

The Village of Hamel routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The first table in this report shows the results of Illinois American’s monitoring for the period of January 1st​​ to December 31st, 2019 at their Granite City supply. Because customers may at times receive water from the East St. Louis supply, the second table contains the monitoring information from that distribution system. The third table includes the system monitoring data for the Village of Hamel.

 

ILLINOIS-AMERICAN WATER QUALITY REPORT (GRANITE CITY)

The next several tables summarize contaminants detected in your drinking water supply.

 

Inorganic Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of​​ Levels Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Sodium1

2019

15

14.9 – 14.9

N/A

N/A

ppm

No

Erosion from naturally occurring deposits: Used in water softener regeneration.

Fluoride2

2019

0.8

0.77 – 0.77

4

4.0

ppm

No

Erosion of​​ natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen)

2019

4

3.53 – 3.53

10

10

ppm

No

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of​​ natural deposits.

1​​ There is no state or federal MCL for sodium. Monitoring is required to provide information to consumers and health officials that are concerned about sodium intake due to dietary precautions. If you are on a sodium-restricted diet, you​​ should consult a physician about this level of sodium in the water.

2​​ Fluoride is added to the water supply to help promote strong teeth. The Illinois Department of Public Health recommends a fluoride level of 0.7 mg/L. 

 

Turbidity3

Limit​​ (Treatment Technique)

Level Detected

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Lowest Monthly % Meeting Limit

0.3 NTU

99.4%

No

Soil runoff.

Highest Single Measurement

1 NTU

0.41 NTU

No

Soil runoff.

3​​ Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the​​ water caused by suspended particles. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system, water quality, and disinfectants. The treatment technique requires that at least 95% of routine samples are less than or equal​​ to 0.3 NTU, and no sample exceeds 1 NTU. We are reporting the percentage of all readings meeting the standard of 0.3 NTU, plus the single highest reading for the year.

 

Total Organic Carbon

The percentage of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal was​​ measured each month and the system met all TOC removal requirements set by IEPA. TOC has no health effects but contributes to the formation of disinfection by-products.  Reduction of TOC can help to minimize disinfection by-product formation.

 

 

UNREGULATED CONTAMINANT MONITORING RULE (UCMR4)4

  Substance (units)

Year Sampled

Amount Detected (Avg)

Range of Detections

Typical Source

Manganese (ppb)

2019

10.48

4.7 – 16

Naturally occurring element; commercially available in combination with other​​ elements and minerals; used in steel production, fertilizer, batteries and fireworks; drinking water and wastewater treatment chemical; essential nutrient.

Total Haloacetic Acids 9 – UCMR4 (ppb)

2019

26.69

18 – 42

By-product of drinking water​​ disinfection.

4​​ Unregulated contaminants are those for which EPA has not established drinking water standards. The purpose of unregulated contaminant monitoring is to assist EPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water and whether future regulation is warranted. A maximum contaminant level (MCL) for these substances has not been established by either state or federal regulations, nor has mandatory health effects language. 

Note: The IEPA requires monitoring of certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Therefore, some of this data in the table above, though accurate, may be more than one year old.

Granite City Violation Summary Table

We are​​ happy to announce that no monitoring, reporting, treatment technique, maximum residual disinfectant level, or maximum contaminant level violations were recorded during 2019.

 

ILLINOIS-AMERICAN WATER QUALITY REPORT (EAST ST. LOUIS)

Inorganic​​ Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Fluoride1

2019

0.7

0.71 – 0.72

4

4.0

ppm

No

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth;​​ Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen)

2019

5

1.78 – 4.71

10

10

ppm

No

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

Sodium2

2019

21

18.7 – 21.2

N/A

N/A

ppm

No

Erosion from naturally occurring deposits: Used in water softener regeneration.

1​​ Fluoride is added to the water supply to help promote strong teeth. The Illinois Department of Public Health recommends a fluoride level of 0.7 mg/L.

2​​ There is no​​ state or federal MCL for sodium. Monitoring is required to provide information to consumers and health officials that are concerned about sodium intake due to dietary precautions. If you are on a sodium-restricted diet, you should consult a physician about​​ this level of sodium in the water.

 

Radiological Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Gross Alpha emitters excluding radon and uranium

2014

1.5

1.5 – 1.5

0

15

pCi/L

No

Erosion of natural deposits.

Beta/Photon emitters3

2014

4.4

4.4 – 4.4

0

4

mrem/yr

No

Erosion of natural deposits.

3​​ The MCL for Beta/photon emitters is written as 4 millirem/year (measure of rate of radiation absorbed by the body).​​ Laboratory results are reported in pCi/L as we have on the table above. EPA considers 50 pCi/L as the level of concern for beta emitters.

 

 

Turbidity4

Limit (Treatment Technique)

Level Detected

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Lowest​​ Monthly % Meeting Limit

0.3 NTU

100%

No

Soil runoff.

Highest Single Measurement

1 NTU

0.31 NTU

No

Soil runoff.

4​​ Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water caused by suspended particles. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the​​ effectiveness of our filtration system, water quality, and disinfectants. The treatment technique requires that at least 95% of routine samples are less than or equal to 0.3 NTU, and no sample exceeds 1 NTU. We are reporting the percentage of all readings​​ meeting the standard of 0.3 NTU, plus the single highest reading for the year.

 

Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR4)5

Year Sampled

Amount Detected (Average)

Units

Range of Detections

Likely Source of Contamination

2-Methoxyethanol

2019

0.075

ppb

ND – 0.60

Used in a number of consumer products, such as synthetic cosmetics, perfumes, fragrances, hair preparations and skin lotions.

Manganese

2019

7.31

ppb

2.5 – 17

Naturally-occurring element; commercially​​ available in combination with other elements and minerals; used in steel production, fertilizer, batteries and fireworks; drinking water and wastewater treatment chemical; essential nutrient.

Total Haloacetic Acids -9 UCMR4

2019

20.59

ppb

11 – 49

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

5​​ Unregulated contaminants are those for which EPA has not established drinking water standards. The purpose of unregulated contaminant monitoring is to assist EPA in determining the occurrence   of unregulated contaminants in drinking water and whether future regulation is warranted.  A maximum contaminant level (MCL) for these substances has not been established by either state or federal regulations, nor has mandatory health effects language

 

Total​​ Organic Carbon

The percentage of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal was measured each month and the system met all TOC removal requirements set by IEPA. TOC has no health effects but contributes to the formation of disinfection by-products.  Reduction of​​ TOC can help to minimize disinfection by-product formation.

Note: The IEPA requires monitoring of certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Therefore, some of this data in the table above, though accurate, may be more than one year old.

East St. Louis Violation Summary Table

We are happy to announce that no monitoring, reporting, treatment technique, maximum residual disinfectant level, or maximum contaminant level violations were recorded during 2019.

 

VILLAGE OF HAMEL WATER REPORT

Regulated Substances

 

Date Sampled

MCLG

Action​​ 
Level (AL)

90th​​ Percentile

# Sites Over AL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Copper

2019

1.3

1.3

1.25

0

ppm

No

Erosion of natural​​ deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing systems.

Lead​​ - If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline 800-426-4791 or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Disinfectants and Disinfection​​ 
By-Products

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Level Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Chloramines

2019

1.1

0.7 - 1.1

MRDLG = 4

MRDL ​​ = 4

ppm

N

Water additive used​​ 
to control microbes.

Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

2019

11

3 - 20

No goal for the total

60

ppb

N

By-product of drinking water​​ disinfection.

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM)

2019

51

21 - 94

No goal for the total

80

ppb

N

By-product of drinking water disinfection.

*Chlorine and chloramines are disinfecting agents added to control microbes that otherwise could cause​​ waterborne diseases or other water quality concerns. Most water systems in Illinois are required by law to add either chlorine or chloramines. Levels well in excess of the MRDL could cause irritation of the eyes or nose in some people. The values reported​​ reflect multiple locations in the service area. Chloramines are a disinfectant made from combining chlorine and ammonia.

Violations Table

CONSUMER CONFIDENCE RULE

Violation Type

Violation Begin

Violation End

Violation Explanation

Corrected Action

CCR​​ REPORT

07/01/2019

07/22/2019

We failed to provide to you, our drinking water customers, an annual report that informs you about the quality of our drinking water and characterizes the risks from exposure to contaminants detected in our drinking water.​​ 

Included corrective language and republished.

DEFINITION OF TERMS

LEAD

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and​​ components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting around for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your​​ tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline 800-426-4791 or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.​​ 

CRYPTOSPORIDIUM

Cryptosporidium​​ is a protozoan found in untreated surface waters through the United States (the organism is generally not​​ present in a ground water source). Although filtration removes Cryptosporidium, the most commonly used filtration methods cannot guarantee 100% removal. Ingestion of Cryptosporidium may cause cryptosporidiosis, an abdominal infection. Symptoms of infection​​ include nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. Most healthy individuals can overcome the disease within a few weeks. However, people with severely weakened immune systems have a risk of developing life-threatening illness. We encourage such people to consult their doctors regarding appropriate precautions to take to avoid infection. Cryptosporidium must be ingested to cause disease, and it is spread through means other than drinking water.

USEPA issued a new rule in 2006 that requires systems with higher​​ Cryptosporidium levels in their source water to provide additional treatment.

In 2015, our monitoring of the Mississippi River raw untreated water indicated the presence of this organism. The Mississippi River cryptosporidium levels ranged from not detected to 0.698 oocysts/L, with an average of 0.079 oocysts/L. Although this organism is present, it is at levels low enough that no supplemental treatment is required by our facility per USEPA standards.

Non-Detects (ND) -​​ laboratory analysis indicates that the contaminant is not present. Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l)​​ - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter- one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000. Picocuries per liter (pCi/L)​​ - Picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water. Millirems per year (mrem/yr)​​ - measure of radiation absorbed by the body.​​ Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU)​​ - nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.​​ Action Level (AL)​​ - the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.​​ Treatment Technique (TT) -​​ A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Contaminant Level-​​ The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest​​ level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.​​ Maximum Contaminant Level Goal- The “Goal” (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below​​ which there is no know or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.​​ Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level- the MRDL is the highest level of disinfectant routinely allowed in drinking water. Addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.​​ Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal- The level of drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health.

As you can see by the table there were no violations. Your drinking water meets or​​ exceeds all Federal and State requirements. “All sources of drinking water are subject to potential contamination by contaminants that are naturally occurring or are manmade. Those contaminants can be microbes, organic or inorganic chemicals, or radioactive materials” All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that​​ the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated contaminants, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in- a-million chance of having the described health effect.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in​​ drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or another immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can​​ be particularly at risk form infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their healthcare providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline.